Ideal Taxes Association

Raymond Richman       -       Jesse Richman       -       Howard Richman

 Richmans' Trade and Taxes Blog



Michael Savage proposes 20% tariff on Chinese products
Howard Richman, 10/5/2010

In his  book that just came out today, "Trickle Up Poverty," Conservative talk show host Michael Savage has proposed a tariff on Chinese goods in order to restore America's manufacturing sector, specifically:

20 percent tariffs on all China made goods immediately; rising by 5 percent each year for each year China refuses to revalue their currency.

Savage calls his collection of proposals his "Manifesto for Saving America." There is a major change occurring within conservative thought.

Your Name:

Post a Comment:


Comment by Larry Walker, Jr., 10/6/2010:

"There is a major change occurring within conservative thought." - Thanks to you.


Comment by Harold, 10/7/2010:

Sounds more like a Manifesto to Crush the Consumer. A 20% tariff? Are you kidding me? How much more can you strangle the global free market? Tariffs are never a win and they're already out of control. The U.S. has over 12,000 tariffs at mind boggling rates. When there are tariffs, the consumer suffers and that ultimately hurts American progress. If you want a little more education, I recommend reading a report on www.pulpwars.com. It'll open your eyes.

Response to this comment by , 10/7/2010:
Harold - "American Progress" towards what, exactly? The total desmantling of every last remaining industry. All you have to do is look around and you'll see 15 million unemployed here while China is booming. If prices going up means more jobs in America and less $1.50 hour jobs in China, then that's the price we need to be willing to pay.
Response to this comment by Bill, 10/8/2010:
"When there are tariffs, the consumer suffers and that ultimately hurts American progress." Oh boy. You can lead a horse to water....
Response to this comment by Howard Richman, 10/8/2010:
You are indeed correct that when there is balanced trade and a tariff is placed upon goods coming from another country, the consumer suffers. However, if a tariff acts to balance trade the consumer, to the extent he is a worker, benefits.


Comment by Brian, 10/8/2010:

How the hell would anyone suffer by america manufacturing. The reason the trinkets that represent a large percent of chinese export are so cheap is because they refuse to revalue their currency while they laugh at us for buying it all, making an oppressive nation a global power.  In the mean time america is on the brink and the comments here are about the consumer!!! Trust that china would compete very hard if americans could buy american computer parts & fake poo, creating a far more robust global marketplace. We are capable we're just sleeping, hopefully you people will wake up....The consumer....Spineless Americans WTF happened to us our fathers & grandfathers had chunks of guys like you in thier stool 




  • Richmans' Blog    RSS
  • Our New Book - Balanced Trade
  • Buy Trading Away Our Future
  • Read Trading Away Our Future
  • Richmans' Commentaries
  • ITA Working Papers
  • ITA on Facebook
  • Contact Us

    Archive
    Dec 2017
    Nov 2017
    Oct 2017
    Sep 2017
    Aug 2017
    Jul 2017
    Jun 2017
    May 2017
    Apr 2017
    Mar 2017
    Feb 2017
    Jan 2017
    Dec 2016
    Nov 2016
    Oct 2016
    Sep 2016
    Aug 2016
    Jul 2016
    Jun 2016
    May 2016
    Apr 2016
    Mar 2016
    Feb 2016
    Jan 2016
    Dec 2015
    Nov 2015
    Oct 2015
    Sep 2015
    Aug 2015
    Jul 2015
    Jun 2015
    May 2015
    Apr 2015
    Mar 2015
    Feb 2015
    Jan 2015
    Dec 2014
    Nov 2014
    Oct 2014
    Sep 2014
    Aug 2014
    Jul 2014
    Jun 2014
    May 2014
    Apr 2014
    Mar 2014
    Feb 2014
    Jan 2014
    Dec 2013
    Nov 2013
    Oct 2013
    Sep 2013
    Aug 2013
    Jul 2013
    Jun 2013
    May 2013
    Apr 2013
    Mar 2013
    Feb 2013
    Jan 2013
    Dec 2012
    Nov 2012
    Oct 2012
    Sep 2012
    Aug 2012
    Jul 2012
    Jun 2012
    May 2012
    Apr 2012
    Mar 2012
    Feb 2012
    Jan 2012
    Dec 2011
    November 2011
    October 2011
    September 2011
    August 2011
    July 2011
    June 2011
    May 2011
    April 2011
    March 2011
    February 2011
    January 2011
    December 2010
    November 2010
    October 2010

    September 2010
    August 2010
    July 2010
    June 2010
    May 2010
    April 2010
    March 2010
    February 2010
    January 2010

    Categories:
    Book Reviews
    Capital Gains Taxation
    Corporate Income Tax
    Consumption Taxes
    Economy - Long Term
    Economy - Short Term
    Environmental Regulation
    Real Estate Taxation
    Trade

    Miscellaneous

    Outside Links:

  • American Economic Alert
  • American Jobs Alliance
  • Angry Bear Blog
  • Economy in Crisis
  • Econbrowser
  • Emmanuel Goldstein's Blog
  • Levy Economics Institute
  • McKeever Institute
  • Michael Pettis Blog
  • Naked Capitalism
  • Natural Born Conservative
  • Science & Public Policy Inst.
  • TradeReform.org
  • Votersway Blog
  • Watt's Up With That


    Wikipedia:

  • [An] extensive argument for balanced trade, and a program to achieve balanced trade is presented in Trading Away Our Future, by Raymond Richman, Howard Richman and Jesse Richman. “A minimum standard for ensuring that trade does benefit all is that trade should be relatively in balance.” [Balanced Trade entry]

    Journal of Economic Literature:

  • [Trading Away Our Future] Examines the costs and benefits of U.S. trade and tax policies. Discusses why trade deficits matter; root of the trade deficit; the “ostrich” and “eagles” attitudes; how to balance trade; taxation of capital gains; the real estate tax; the corporate income tax; solving the low savings problem; how to protect one’s assets; and a program for a strong America....

    Atlantic Economic Journal:

  • In Trading Away Our Future   Richman ... advocates the immediate adoption of a set of public policy proposal designed to reduce the trade deficit and increase domestic savings.... the set of public policy proposals is a wake-up call... [February 17, 2009 review by T.H. Cate]